Warmwater Fly of the month: November, 2005 - Sister Carol's Grass Carp Fly
 

Tying Sister Carol's Grass Carp Fly

#1/0 Sister Carol's Grass Carp Fly

(Tied By Sister Carol)

 

Grass Carp Fly:

I was tying at the FFFSouthern 2005 Council Conclave. When I am not tying, I visit with the other fly tiers. I have seen Sister Carol tie at the Conclave before. She ties very partical patterns that always works. At this Conclave she was tying a pattern that imitates aquatic plant life. Sister Carol uses this pattern to go after grass carp and has done very well with this pattern.

Biography:

Sister Carol Anne Corley, RSM, Hot Springs. Arkansas Sister Carol Anne is a Religious Sister of Mercy of the St. Louis Region. She is currently acting as the Education& Director and Program Developer for the United States Youth Flyfishing Association. In that capacity, she has developed and implemented the Streets to Streams and "lyre Flies" youth educational programs. She is a volunteer teacher at St. John's Catholic Elementary School where she teaches fly tying in the Art curriculum, Water Conservation and Aquatic Ecology in the Science curriculum and coordinates the St. Johns Stream Team and Classroom Aquarium projects She has taught fly tying and fly casting for the Boy Scouts. The Girl Scouts, the Garland County Community College, and various other groups, as well as private individuals.


Sister has spoken on flyfishing, fly tying and/or developing youth programs at local, state, regional and international fly- fishing club and organization meetings. She is a contributing author in The No Nonsense Guide to Women Favorite Fly- fishing Destinations. Sister has been featured in many newspaper and magazine articles and has appeared on the David Letterman Show. She has been teaching fly tying for 10 years and has demonstrated at numerous national. regional and local shows and conclaves She enjoys teaching a range of skill levels from basic techniques for beginners to tying tips and tricks for experienced tiers. Designing and teaching foam fly patterns is one of her specialties.

 

SISTER CAROL'S GRASS CARP FLY TYING INSTRUCTIONS

Hook: 1/0 Aberdeen Hook
Thread: Coats & Clark Dual Duty Okra
Tail & Body: Bernat Boa #81236
Wing: Peacock





(Click on picture to enlarge)

Step 1: Measure out about 12 inches of Boa.

Step 2: Start the thread about 2/3 from the eye of the hook to about the end of the barb.

Step 3: Attach one end of the boa to the hook where you stopped the thread in Step 2.

Step 4: Measure about 4 inches of boa from where it is tied on the hook and loop (fold) it back on to the hook and secure it. Notice that the colors on the boa should not match up on each side but should be different.

Step 5: With a pair of hackle pliers at the end of the loop, start twisting the boa.

Step 6: Twist the boa until it starts twisting on itself like a knot and then stop.

Step 7: Release the pliers and the boa should twist on itself.

Step 8: With the remaining boa loop (fold) it back on to the hook and secure it. Advance the thread to about two eye length from the eye of the hook. Notice that the colors on the boa should not match up on each side but should be different.

Step 9: With a pair of hackle pliers at the end of the loop, start twisting the boa.

Step 10: Twist the boa until it starts looking like the picture on the far right.

Step 11: With the twisted boa still secured with the hackle pliers, start wrapping the boa forward.

Step 12: While wrapping the boa foward, stroke back the ends of the boa towards the back of the hook.

Step 13: Stop the boa about two eye length from the eye of the hook.

Step 14: Select about four or five strips of peacock herl.

Step 15: The length of peacock herl to be tied on the the hook should be about the length of the hook to the end of the tail. Do not cut the remainding peacock herl.

Step 16: Select about four strips of peacock herl.

Step 17: Secure the peacock herl to the side of the hook closest to you. Do not cut the remainding peacock herl.

Step 18: Select about four strips of peacock herl and secure the peacock herl to the oposite side of the hook closest to you. Do not cut the remainding peacock herl.

 

Step 19:Fold he remaining peacock herl towards the back of the hook.

Step 20: Secure the peacock herl.

Step 21: Wrip finish.

Step 22:Trim off the excess peacock herl BUT remember to leave about four to five strans that you tied in step 15 alone. The strans could be at various lengths. In this demostration they have been cut beyoun hook length.

Step 23:Apply a generous amount of head centment.

Step 24: You fly should look simular to the one of the far right.